Upperwood
Academy

DT

At Upperwood Academy, we are committed to providing all children with learning opportunities to engage in Design and Technology. We believe that children should have access to an inspiring and practical subject. Our DT curriculum is designed to give children opportunities to be creative and use their imagination in designing and making products. The skills they acquire draw on a number of cross-curricular subjects such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils will learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, and their own products, they will develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. 

To ensure maximum progression and repeated coverage of knowledge and skills, we build upon areas of knowledge to embed this knowledge into the long term memory. Termly Design & Technology themes identify the key knowledge and skills of each topic and very careful consideration has been given to ensure progression across other DT topics and indeed other subjects throughout each year group across the school. Children’s interests are captured through theme learning, ensuring that links are made in a cross curricular way, giving children motivation and meaning for their learning. When devising our curriculum map and aspects of progression for the teaching and learning in DT, we identified some key aspects for the teaching of DT within our curriculum. Our Design & Technology curriculum is made up of three core projects: food, textiles and structures.

DT Coverage Document

DT Progression Document

The children are taught DT both as a thematic part of their half termly topic work and as discrete teaching of knowledge and skills. 

Our progression in knowledge and skills document for DT clearly outlines the progression for the teaching and learning in each DT area. 

Teachers are provided with additional planning time on top of their PPA, to plan their curriculum. As part of this planning process, teachers need to plan the following:

  • A knowledge organiser which outlines knowledge (including vocabulary) children must master; 
  • A cycle of lessons for each subject, which carefully plans for progression and depth; 
  • A low stakes quiz which is tested regularly to support learners’ ability to block learning and increase space in the working memory; 
  • Trips and visiting experts who will enhance the learning experience; 
  • A means to display and celebrate the pupils’ products in their class.

Mixed year group classes have a carefully planned curriculum to ensure learning is not repeated and prior learning can be built upon.

Our Design & Technology Curriculum is planned to demonstrate progression. If children are keeping up with the curriculum, they are deemed to be making good or better progress. In addition, we measure the impact of our curriculum through the following methods: 

  • A reflection on standards achieved against the planned outcomes recorded on an assessment tool (Eazmag); 
  • A celebration of learning for each unit of work evidenced in a folder;
  • Tracking of gains in each quiz; 
  • Monitoring of workbooks;
  • Pupil discussions about their learning.

Food - In Year 1, children begin with the basic skills of cutting, peeling and squeezing fruit to create a fruit based product. As part of their work with food, children will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating.

Textiles - In Year 1 children will begin to sew in a running stitch and will learn sewing basics of threading a needle and knotting their thread. We practise skills and create a final piece. 

Structures - In Year 1 children will create a structure, possibly a cage for a pet or a model car. They will cut materials safely using scissors, join materials together using glue and demonstrate a range of shaping techniques such as tearing, folding and curling. Mechanical components are introduced in Years 1, 2, 3 and 6, when children create products using axles, wheels, levers, linkages and/or gears to create movement.

Food - In Year 2 children build on skills learnt, with the addition of cutting and grating to make a fruit and/or salad based product for a given specification. As part of their work with food, children will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating.

Textiles – In Year 2 children will use a running stitch to join fabrics together. They will also begin to reflect on the appearance of their product and use finishing techniques such as adding beads/sequins and other materials. 

Structures - In Year 2, children will broaden their cutting techniques using a saw and a bench hook. In additions they will demonstrate a range of joining techniques such as gluing, Jinx triangles or combining materials to strengthen. Mechanical components are introduced in Years 1, 2, 3 and 6, when children create products using axles, wheels, levers, linkages and/or gears to create movement.

Food - From Year 3 onwards a heat source is used and the children will follow a recipe, including measuring ingredients in standard units. Across Key Stage Two recipes become more complex in preparing and assembling the dishes. In Year 4, we take inspiration from our Geography learning on the Mediterranean in our cooking, making healthy pasta salads. As part of their work with food, children will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating.

Textiles - By Year 3 children should confidently be able to complete a running stitch, producing neat and equal stitches. They will use this technique to create a design on their fabric. Their final product will be  for a specific purpose. 

Structures - In Year 3, children will measure, mark out and cut their own materials and apply a range of finishing techniques. Mechanical components are introduced in Years 1, 2, 3 and 6, when children create products using axles, wheels, levers, linkages and/or gears to create movement.

Food - From Year 3 onwards a heat source is used and the children will follow a recipe, including measuring ingredients in standard units. Across Key Stage Two recipes become more complex in preparing and assembling the dishes. In Year 4, we take inspiration from our Geography learning on the Mediterranean in our cooking, making healthy pizzas.  As part of their work with food, children will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating.

Textiles - In Year 4 children will use a combination of stitching techniques such as back stitch for seams and running stitch to attach decoration.

Structures - In Year 4 a mitre box is introduced to cut wood with a 45° angle. Skills are further developed in Year 5 when children use a mitre box to create a 60° angle. 

Electrical systems - In Year 4, children will make a torch, incorporating a battery, bulb, switch and wires.

Food - As part of their work with food, children will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. From Year 3 onwards a heat source is used and the children will follow a recipe, including measuring ingredients in standard units. In Year 5, we use our learning on the Americas to inspire our cooking, fajitas, and homemade burgers with lots of fresh ingredients!  Across Key Stage Two recipes become more complex in preparing and assembling the dishes. 

Textiles - In Year 5 children will use previous stitching techniques as well as cross-stitching to create a pattern. In addition, children will sew on simple components such as buttons, sequins or ribbons to improve their designs. 

Structures - In Year 4 a mitre box is introduced to cut wood with a 45° angle. Skills are further developed in Year 5 when children use a mitre box to create a 60° angle. Children will also apply an understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.

Food - As part of their work with food, children will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. From Year 3 onwards a heat source is used and the children will follow a recipe, including measuring ingredients in standard units. In Year 6, we apply our knowledge of food and our cookery skills to create products for given specifications. Across Key Stage Two recipes become more complex in preparing and assembling the dishes. 

Textiles - In Year 6 children will participate in a fashion show, applying all of their previous skills as well as creating designs on fabrics using applique/pens/paint and will incorporate a fastening component e.g. button/zip/press stud.

Structures -  In Year 6, children will apply all previous skills learnt and make modifications (if needed) when tackling practical problems. Children will also apply a range of accurate finishing techniques to improve the appearance of the structure, overall creating a quality product. Mechanical components are introduced in Years 1, 2, 3 and 6, when children create products using axles, wheels, levers, linkages and/or gears to create movement.

Electrical systems - In Year 6 children will create a vehicle, including a battery, bulb, switch, wires and a motor.